Posted on

Fruit Wines 1 Gallon recipe

Equipment You will Need:

2 fermentation buckets or carboys for primary and

secondary fermentation with airlock and stopper

Cleaner (PBW) and sanitizer (Star-san)

Auto-siphon, tubing, and bottle filler

Swing top bottles or beer bottles with caps and capper

Hydrometer and Hydrometer jar (optional)

 

Ingredients You will Need:

4-6 lbs. fruit (rinsed and drained)

Use more fruit for a bigger flavor

Up to 2.5 lbs of sugar

1 gallon water

¼ tsp Yeast Nutrient

1 oz. priming sugar for bottle carbonation

1 Campden tablet (optional) to kill wild yeast

½ tsp Pectic enzyme (optional) to help clarify

FOR BLACKBERRY WINE- ½ tsp Acid blend

 

Yeast

Dry options- White wine yeast: EC1117, SN9, D47,

Cotes de blanc, or Champagne yeast for a VERY dry,

high alcohol product.

 

Day One

  1. Clean and sanitize all equipment (everything that will touch your wine.)
  2. Crush fruit (do not break pits or stones) and put into primary fermenter with 1 gallon water
  3. (optional) Add one crushed campden tablet and ½ tsp. Pectic enzyme
  4. (optional) Take a hydrometer reading to determine the amount of sugar/ potential alcohol in your juice. Add sugar

to bring the specific gravity reading to up to 1.090 (Add acid blend if making blackberrty wine.

  1. Seal the fermenter with a stopper/ airlock and let sit for 24 hours. (If you did not add a campden tablet you can

skip this step.) If you add your yeast too soon the campden will kill your yeast)

 

Day Two

  1. 24 hours after adding the campden tablet add 1/4th tsp. yeast nutrient and sprinkle the yeast on top of your juice. (One packet of yeast is enough for 5 gallons of wine. For a one gallon batch use 1/3rd packet.)
  1. Ferment at 65º- 75º Warmer temperatures will bring out more fruity/ estery flavors.

 

Primary Fermentation

  1. You will begin to see activity in the fermenter within 48 hours. A foamy cap will develop on the top of the wine and bubbles will escape through the airlock.
  1. Fruit pulp will float to the top. “punch down” the pulp once or twice a day by pushing the pulp below the juice using a sanitized spoon or ladle. Over the next several days the activity will begin to slow down. Primary fermentation typically lasts one to two weeks.

 

Secondary Fermentation

  1. Strain the fruit pulp out of the juice and rack the wine into a sanitized carboy being careful to leave behind any sediment. It is best to minimize head space in the secondary fermenter to prevent oxidation. Timing now is somewhat flexible. Leave the wine in this secondary fermenter for at least 2 weeks and as long as 6 months.
  2. Optional- monitor the progress of your fermentation by taking hydrometer readings. You are ready to bottle when the wine is clear and tastes good.

 

Bottling and Beyond

  1. Fermentation is finished when the final gravity (FG) reads approximately 1.010.
  2. If you would like a fizzy carbonated wine make a simple syrup by boiling 1oz. of priming sugar with a cup of water on the stove. (1 oz sugar per gallon of wine) Let this mixture cool to room temperature.
  3. Sanitize your bottling equipment (ten 12 oz. bottles per gallon of wine, auto-siphon, tubing, bottle filler, bottling bucket, and bottle caps).
  4. Add the room temperature simple syrup to the bottling bucket then siphon your wine into the bottling bucket so that the sugar mixes evenly.
  5. After you have added the priming sugar, or f you want a still wine, siphon the wine from the bottling bucket into your bottles and cap. Your wine will be ready to drink after conditioning for two weeks at room temperature.

 

* F.H. Steinbart rents fruit presses.

They book up fast, so reserve yours in advance by visiting fhsteinbart.com and clicking the ‘rentals’ button.

If you have any questions about the instructions in this recipe please call: 503 232 8793 or email info@fhsteinbart.com

Ingredients

670-A-1             ¼ tsp Yeast Nutrient

870-D-1             1 oz. priming sugar for bottle carbonation

420-A-1             1 Campden tablet  to kill wild yeast

460-A-1             ½ tsp Pectic enzyme to help clarify

400-A-1             BLACKBERRY WINE- ½ tsp Acid blend

Yeast Options

623-1    EC1117,

45588    SN9,

624-1    D47,

652-1    Cotes de blanc, or

652-2    Champagne yeast

Posted on

Oregon Super Dank

Featuring Mecca Grade Malt and Crosby Hops

Description: Oregon Super Dank is our indigenous NW

style ale. This beer features Opal 44, an estate grown malt from Mecca Grade that adds a subtle note of toffee and enough malt character to provide a backbone for the resinous Willamette Valley hops grown by Crosby Hop

Farm. The beer is finished off with a West Coast ale strain, which ferments quick and clean, creating an infinitely drinkable yet profoundly flavorful go-to beer.

Malt

7 lb. Extra Light Liquid Malt Extract

1 lb. Mecca Grade Opal 44 Malt

(crushed grains in steeping bag)

 

Hops

1 oz. Crosby Hop Farms Nugget

2 oz. Crosby Hop Farms Centennial

1 oz. Crosby Hop Farms Amarillo

1 oz. Crosby Hop Farms Comet

Yeast

BRY-97 American West Coast

(Liquid Yeast Alternative- Imperial Yeast, Buckman)

You will also need

4 oz. Priming Sugar for bottling

5 Hop Steeping Bags

Optional-1 Whirflock Tablet (to clarify beer)

 

ABV= 4.9

IBU= 55

OG= 1.048

FG= 1.010

SRM= 10

 


On Brew Day

  1. Heat 2.5 gallons of good quality water
  2. Steep crushed grains in steeping bag for 20-30 minutes or until the water reaches 170. Remove grains and compost.
  3. Bring to a boil and remove from heat. Add liquid and/ or Dry Malt extract and stir to dissolve. The liquid is now called wort.  Return liquid to a boil, watching carefully for boil overs.

Hop Schedule:

A standard hop schedule tells you when to add your hops to the kettle throughout the one hour boiling time. Hops added

at 60 minutes are boiled for the entire hour. Hops added at 15 minutes are added when there are 15 minutes remaining in the boil. Etc.

  1. Use one ounce of hop pellets per steeping bag and tie a knot at the top- allowing as much room as possible for the hops to expand inside the bag.

1 oz. Nugget @ 60 min.

1 oz. Centennial @ 15 min.

(Add the Whirflock tablet at 15 min.)

1 oz. Amarillo @ 1 min.

1 oz. Comet, @ 1 min.

1oz. Centennial @ 1 min.

  1. Chill wort to 100 degrees as fast as possible. If you do not have a wort chiller, set the kettle in an ice bath in your sink.
  2. While the wort is chilling, sanitize fermenting equipment, carboy, stopper, airlock, funnel, etc.
  3. Add 2.5 gal. cold clean water to primary fermenter. Pour chilled wort into fermenter and top off with more cold water to reach 5 gallons.
  4. Aerate wort by putting a stopper in the carboy and rocking it back and forth for several minutes.
  5. Optional- take a specific gravity reading using a triple scale hydrometer and hydrometer jar. The reading should be approximately 1.048 Record the number as your OG (original gravity)
  6. Pitch your yeast when the wort is at room temperature (60-75 degrees.) Fill airlock with water or sanitizer to the fill line and seal fermenter.

 

Primary Fermentation

You will begin to see activity in the fermenter within 48 hours. A foamy cap will develop on the top of the beer and bubbles will escape through the airlock. Over the next several days the activity will begin to slow down. Primary fermentation typically lasts one to two weeks. Optional- rack the beer into a sanitized carboy being careful to leave behind any sediment. Leave the beer in this secondary fermenter for an additional one to two more weeks.

Bottling and Beyond

Fermentation is finished when the final gravity (FG) reads approximately 1.010, but the timing at this stage is flexible. When you are ready to bottle your beer, make a simple syrup by combing 4 oz. of priming sugar in a cup or two of water on the stove. Let this cool to room temperature. Sanitize your bottling equipment (Fifty 12 oz. bottles, auto-siphon, tubing, bottle filler, and bottle caps) and add the sugar to the sanitized bottling bucket. Siphon your beer into the bottling bucket to mix thoroughly with the priming sugar and then siphon the beer into your bottles and cap. Your beer will be ready to drink after conditioning for two weeks at room temperature.

If you have any questions about the instructions in this kit please call: 503 232 8793 or email info@fhsteinbart.com

Malt

900-AB-1           7 lb. Extra Light Liquid Malt Extract

1180-O44-1        1 lb. Mecca Grade Opal 44 Malt

Hops

1032-NUG-1       1 oz. Crosby Hop Farms Nugget

1032-CEN-1       2 oz. Crosby Hop Farms Centennial

1032-AMA-1      1 oz. Crosby Hop Farms Amarillo

1032-COM-5      1 oz. Crosby Hop Farms Comet

Yeast

1140-1               BRY-97 American West Coast

IMP-A39           Liquid Yeast Alternative- Imperial Yeast, Buckman)

You will also need:

870-D-7             4 oz. Priming Sugar for bottling

HSB                 2 Hop Steeping Bags

1081-A-1           Optional- 1 Whirflock Tablet

Posted on

Citra IPA

Citra IPA Recipe from Portland Oregon

Citra IPA

Our best-selling beer kit at F.H. Steinbart. Source: Duke Green

Description: This popular West Coast style I.P.A. is bursting with tropical fruit flavors and aromas from a full six ounces of Citra hops. The hoppyness is balanced by a soft malty backbone and finished with a clean US05 yeast. This beer is a year round favorite.

Malt

7 lb. Extra Light Liquid Malt Extract

1 lb. Dry Light Malt Extract

1 lb. Crystal 20

8 oz. Munich Malt

Hops

6 oz. Citra

Yeast

Dry option- US05

Liquid option- Imperial Flagship or Wyeast 1056

ABV= 5.5%

IBU= 60

OG= 1.062

FG= 1.018

SRM= 6

 

 


You will also need:

4 oz. Priming Sugar for bottling

6 Hop Steeping Bags

Optional- 1 Whirflock Tablet (to clarify beer)

 

On Brew Day

  1. Heat 2.5 gallons of good quality water
  2. Steep crushed grains in steeping bag for 20-30 minutes or until the water reaches 170. Remove grains and compost.

3.Bring to a boil and remove from heat. Add liquid and/ or Dry Malt extract and stir to dissolve. The liquid is now called wort.  Return liquid to a boil, watching carefully for boil overs.

During the boil

A standard hop schedule tells you when to add your hops to the kettle throughout the one hour boiling time. Hops added at 60 minutes are boiled for the entire hour. Hops added at 15 minutes are added when there are 15 minutes remaining in the boil. Etc.

4. Use one ounce of hop pellets per steeping bag and tie a knot at the top- allowing as much room as possible for the hops to expand inside the bag.

Hop Schedule:

1 oz. Citra @ 60 min.

1 oz. Citra @ 15 min.

(Add the Whirflock tablet at 15 min.)

1 oz. Citra @ 5 min.

2 oz. Citra- Dry hop in the secondary fermenter

for three days.

  1. Chill wort to 100 degrees as fast as possible. If you do not have a wort chiller, set the kettle in an ice bath in your sink.
  2. While the wort is chilling, sanitize fermenting equipment, carboy, stopper, airlock, funnel, etc.
  3. Add 2.5 gal. cold clean water to primary fermenter. Pour chilled wort into fermenter and top off with more cold water to reach 5 gallons.
  4. Aerate wort by putting a stopper in the carboy and rocking it back and forth for several minutes.
  5. Optional- take a specific gravity reading using a triple scale hydrometer and hydrometer jar. The reading should be approximately 1.062 Record the number as your OG (original gravity)
  6. Pitch your yeast when the wort is at room temperature (68-70 degrees.) Fill airlock with water or sanitizer to the fill line and seal fermenter.

 

Primary Fermentation

You will begin to see activity in the fermenter within 48 hours. A foamy cap will develop on the top of the beer and bubbles will escape through the airlock. Over the next several days the activity will begin to slow down. Primary fermentation typically lasts one to two weeks. Optional- rack the beer into a sanitized carboy being careful to leave behind any sediment. Leave the beer in this secondary fermenter for an additional one to two more weeks.

 

Bottling and Beyond

Fermentation is finished when the final gravity (FG) reads approximately 1.018, but the timing at this stage is flexible. When you are ready to bottle your beer, make a simple syrup by combing 4 oz. of priming sugar in a cup or two of water on the stove. Let this cool to room temperature. Sanitize your bottling equipment (Fifty 12 oz. bottles, auto-siphon, tubing, bottle filler, and bottle caps) and add the sugar to the bottling bucket. Siphon your beer into the bottling bucket to mix thoroughly with the sugar. Then siphon the beer into your bottles using the bottle filler and cap. Your beer will be ready to drink after conditioning for two weeks at room temperature.

If you have any questions about the instructions in this recipe please call: 503 232 8793 or email info@fhsteinbart.com

 

Malt

 

 

Hops and Yeast (dry and liquid options)

 

You will also need:

 

Posted on

Style of the Week: Fresh Hop Beer

fresh hops better

‘Nuff said?

Well folks, it’s that time of year again, and we seem to like to add fresh hops to our brew kettles to get that fresh hop flavor, and aroma. I’ve made a few observations about using fresh hops that I’d like to share with you! Firstly, use them as soon as you get them. Time is critical, and if you simply can’t use them right away, vacuum seal and shrink them down so as much air is removed as is practical. Then freeze the hops in your freezer until ready to use them (this may result in a decreased boil, but still maintain your countdown to flameout) in your fresh hop beer. Pick a style that showcases fresh hops like Pale Ales, Ambers, or Reds. Even Wheat Beers, and light lagers will do well with fresh hops. I even made an old ale with fresh hops that even the most skeptical of my coworkers admitted turned out well. So without delay, here is a great recipe to make using fresh hops!
Extract:

  • 7 lbs. Light LME
  • 1 lb. Medium British Crystal Malt
  • 1 oz. Goldings Hops (Bitter)
  • 1 lb. Fresh hops (more or less suited to taste)
  • Whirlfloc tablet or Irish Moss
  • ¼ oz. Brewing Salts in the boil.
  • Wyeast 1056, WLP001, Imperial Flagship, or Safale US-05 yeast

Instructions:

Heat 2½ gallons of water to 155°F.
Turn off heat, and steep specialty grains for 20~30 minutes.
Add LME, stirring until fully dissolved.
Add water to volume, return to heat, bring to boil for 10 min.
At 20 minutes remaining in the boil, add the fresh hops.
At 15 minutes remaining in the boil, add a Whirfloc tablet.
After boil has finished, turn off heat, then cool wort by placing kettle in an ice bath or use a wort chiller (0 min).
Add mixture to fermenter, removing hops, and bring total volume to 5 gallons using non-distilled bottled water or filtered tap water.
Aerate unfermented wort (shaking works well).
Pitch yeast and ferment at 68° F until completed (about a week).
Allow to age an additional four to six weeks before packaging up as usual.

All Grain:

  • 9 lbs. Pale Ale Malt
  • 1 lb. Medium British Crystal Malt
  • 1 oz. Goldings Hops (Bittering)
  • 1 lb. Fresh hops (more or less suited to taste)
  • Whirlfloc tablet or Irish Moss
  • ¼ oz. Brewing Salts in the mash and in the boil.
  • Wyeast 1056, WLP001, Imperial Flagship, or Safale US-05 yeast

Procedure:

Infusion mash at 152°F for 1 hour, using a standard (1.33 qt./lb.) mash. Sparge to 6.5 gallons of wort, and bring to a roiling boil. At 20 minutes remaining, add the fresh hops. At 15 minutes remaining add the Whirlfloc tablet or Irish moss. At 0 minutes (knockout), cool the mixture by placing kettle in an ice bath or using a wort chiller. Add mixture to fermenter, removing hops, and aerate unfermented wort (shaking works well). Pitch yeast and ferment at 68°F. Gravity may vary depending on system efficiency, so adjust accordingly, using malt extract if needed.

Package up as usual; bottled versions should use 100 gms. corn sugar (approx. ¾ cup), or kegged to 15 psig at 38°F, and allow two weeks to come into condition. Serve at 55°~60°F in a Tulip glass or Thistle glass, so share, and enjoy! This beer will continue to evolve and change over the coming months, so make enough to last you through your next brew.